Friday, July 17, 2015

This Applies to Programming Too!

If you are a Programmer Director, air talent, or anyone who interacts with clients, event partners and listeners, you need to pay attention to the “Sales Tips” that come from sales consultants and professionals like Dave Warawa.  The reality is, you are in sales. Every day you are selling your talent and your brand to the listeners and the clients.

Dave writes about the lost art of handwritten thank you notes from sales to prospective clients;  how that one small gesture has a tremendous impact on making that person feel acknowledged and important. 

Here are a few tips on how you can apply his five daily sales affirmations to programming:

1. The true definition of client service is doing something that is not required or expected 

Take the time to comb the Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages of some of your most interactive listeners and clients.  Like, reply, share and retweet their successes and experiences. Show them that they are important to you and their life experiences matter.

Send a handwritten thank you card/congratulations (or leave it at the front desk with the prize) when a listener wins on your show.  Send a handwritten thank you card to a client when they use you for an endorsement, remote or sponsor a charity event for the station. 

2. The true value-add your client appreciates is the relationship he or she has with you. 

Use direct messaging, phone, text and email to personally have conversations with your listeners.  Use on-air content about your life that allows listeners to comment, contribute and share in your experiences.  Make sure the relationship is a two way street.

When you get calls, texts or emails about a success story with a client, call them and share the story.  Don’t just send it to sales, ask for a direct contact so that you can personally share the story. 

3. The true product is the experience of buying the product.

Take the time to follow up with listeners about their experience when listening to and/or interacting with your station.  Ask anyone who calls, texts, e-mails or posts about a specific promotion, an on-going bit, a recurring character; be specific in your questions and you will get better feedback with more actionable results.

When you take part in a large station event or remote, follow up with the client and ask what worked and what didn’t work.  How can we better serve you in the future? 

4. The most valued benefit you can offer your client is knowledge and education through expertise.

Know your local market. Get involved Government, service organizations and charities.  Keep your listeners informed about big events, traffic issues, and changes in taxes, utilities and retail.  Make sure they can trust you to keep them informed about what is going on in their community; particularly anything that will impact their daily life.  

Program Directors and Marketing Directors need to be knowledgeable about venues, permits, and successful events in the community.  That way when a sponsor, artist or charity comes to you about a potential event, you can be a terrific resource.  It will help you build a stronger relationship; which in turn secures exclusivity and future business for the station. 

5. The best product you can offer your clients is your integrity, sincerity and character.

On the air and off the air, make sure you are meeting listener and client expectations by doing all of the above with the humility and caring of one who is there to serve.  Be authentic both on and off the air.  

On-air talent, must recognize the fact that, while you may not know your listeners by their first name, if you are doing your job right, they know everything about you!  Covet that relationship and build on it at every opportunity.

When you get customer service right, and are personally engaged with the listeners and the clients, it makes it pretty difficult for them to listen to anyone else.

Saturday, March 7, 2015

What is Your Mobile Strategy?

You can’t ignore this freight train.  Your radio station must be active on the most used device, with the most personal impact, and an increasing role in your listener’s daily lives.  

Edison’s Infinite Dial 2015, reveals the strength of on-line radio listening by demo and the device most used to listen:


It is imperative that radio stations improve and market their mobile listening experience if we are going to compete with other music delivery options.  

A&O&B’s 9th Annual Roadmap 2015 (a survey of thousands of country listeners in the U.S. and Canada) confirms that only a small percentage of these Country P1s use their smart phone daily to listen to AM/FM Radio; plus, it trended down slightly in 2015, while use of all other music & entertainment functions increased!


Also note the increase in “using the phone as an alarm clock”; 52.6% to 64.2% in three short years.  The days of waking up to a radio alarm clock are over.   You must perfect, distribute and promote a mobile app, with an alarm clock, that immediately starts streaming your radio station.  The success of morning radio, and loyalty to the rest of the day, depends on it.  

There are many software developers creating unique mobile apps for radio; including our friends at Jacobs Media, who have invested a great deal in developing custom apps for radio.  

Here are few others for consideration:

Hopefully, NextRadio will find a way to distribute their product through all cell providers (not just Sprint) so that FM radio can be available for free on your mobile phone. That is a potential game changer. In the meantime, work on your own mobile strategy. It is a must for radio’s survival.